Area Information

Queens

Resources: wikepedia.org

Queens is the easternmost and largest in area of the five boroughs of New York City. It is geographically adjacent to the borough of Brooklyn at the southwestern end of Long Island, and to Nassau County further east on Long Island; in addition, Queens shares water borders with the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. Coterminous with Queens County since 1899, the borough of Queens is the second-largest in population (after Brooklyn), with a census-estimated 2,339,150 residents in 2015, approximately 48% of them foreign-born.[1] Queens County is also the second-most populous county in the U.S. state of New York, behind the neighboring borough of Brooklyn, which is coterminous with Kings County. Queens is the fourth-most densely populated county among New York City’s boroughs, as well as in the United States. If each New York City borough were an independent city, Queens would also be the nation’s fourth most populous city, after Los Angeles, Chicago, and Brooklyn.[2] Queens is the most ethnically diverse urban area in the world.[3][4]

Queens was established in 1683, as one of the original 12 counties of New York and was named for the Portuguese Princess Catherine of Braganza (1638–1705), Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland.[5][6] It became a borough of New York City in 1898, and from 1683 until 1899, the County of Queens included what is now Nassau County.

Queens has the most diversified economy of the five boroughs of New York City[7] and is home to JFK International Airport and LaGuardia Airport. These airports are among the busiest in the world, causing the airspace above Queens to be the most congested in the country. Attractions in Queens include Flushing Meadows Park — whose Citi Field athletic stadium is home to the New York Mets baseball team — and the US Open tennis tournament; as well as Kaufman Astoria Studios, Silvercup Studios, and Aqueduct Racetrack. The borough has diverse housing, ranging from high-rise apartment buildings in the urban areas of western and central Queens, such as Jackson Heights, Flushing, Astoria, and Long Island City, to suburban neighborhoods in the eastern part of the borough such as Little Neck, Douglaston, and Bayside.

Queens Community Information

Resource: www.wikipedia.org

Astoria

Astoria is a middle-class and commercial neighborhood with a population of 154,000[2] in the northwestern corner of the New York City borough of Queens. Located in Community Board 1, Astoria is bounded by the East River and is adjacent to three other Queens neighborhoods: Long Island City, Sunnyside (bordering at Northern Boulevard), and Woodside (bordering at 50th Street). Astoria is patrolled by the New York City Police Department’s 114th Precinct.[3]Long Island City

Long Island City

Long Island City (L.I.C.) is the westernmost residential and commercial neighborhood of the New York City borough of Queens. L.I.C. is noted for its rapid and ongoing residential growth and gentrification, its waterfront parks, and its thriving arts community.[1] L.I.C. has among the highest concentration of art galleries, art institutions, and studio space of any neighborhood in New York City.[2] It is bordered by Astoria to the north; the East River to the west; Hazen Street, 49th Street, and New Calvary Cemetery in Sunnyside to the east; and Newtown Creek—which separates Queens from Greenpoint, Brooklyn—to the south. It originally was the seat of government of Newtown Township, and remains the largest neighborhood in Queens. The area is part of Queens Community Board 1, located north of the Queensboro Bridge and Queens Plaza; it is also of Queens Community Board 2 to the south.

Long Island City is the eastern terminus of the Queensboro Bridge, also known as the 59th Street Bridge, which is the only non-toll automotive route connecting Queens and Manhattan. Northwest of the bridge terminus are the Queensbridge Houses, a development of the New York City Housing Authority and the largest public housing complex in North America.

Sunnyside

Sunnyside is a working and middle-class neighborhood in the Western portion of the New York City borough of Queens. It shares borders with Hunters Point and Long Island City to the west, Astoria to the north, Woodside to the east and Maspeth to the south. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community District 2, served by Queens Community Board 2.[1]

The name “Sunnyside” originates with the Bragraw family, French Huguenots who had purchased the land in 1713 and named their estate “Sunnyside Hill”.[2][3] Sunnyside was a rural hamlet mostly consisting of small farms and marshland. It was incorporated into Long Island City in 1870, and developed into a bedroom community after the Queensboro Bridge was completed in 1909. A large portion of the neighborhood is six-story apartment buildings constructed during the 1920s and 1930s.

Bayside

Bayside is an upper middle class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. CNN Money ranked Bayside as one of the most expensive housing markets nationally when analyzing comparable detached homes throughout the United States.[1] Despite its large housing stock of free-standing homes, it nationally ranks high to very high in population density.[2][3][4] These homes give the neighborhood a similar feel to other wealthy Queens neighborhoods such as Douglaston and Little Neck. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 11.[5]

Bellerose

Bellerose is a middle class neighborhood on the eastern edge of the New York City borough of Queens, along the border of Queens and Nassau County, Long Island. It is adjacent to Bellerose village and Bellerose Terrace in Nassau County, from which it is separated by Jericho Turnpike. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13.[1] The northern edge of Bellerose is separated from another part of the Nassau border by the neighborhood of Floral Park, Queens to the east, divided by Little Neck Parkway. The neighborhood consists predominantly of detached houses with a mostly Indian American, European American, and working and middle class populations. While the northeastern section of Queens Village is sometimes referred to as part of Bellerose, it is also called Bellerose Manor, which is recognized by the U.S. Postal Service as an “acceptable alternate” to Queens Village and Jamaica in postal addresses.[2]

Bellerose’s public schools are operated by the New York City Department of Education. It is mostly part of District 26 but some areas are in District 29. The neighborhood’s nearest high school is Martin Van Buren High School in Queens Village. Also, the Queens Borough Public Library operates the Bellerose Branch.

New York City Bus serve Floral Park on the Q43, the Q46, the Q36 on Little Neck Parkway on weekdays, and the X68. It is also served by Nassau Inter-County Express on the n22, n22L, n22A. Hillside Avenue, Jamaica Avenue, and Union Turnpike and the three major east-west arteries. The closest railway station is the Bellerose station, located outside the city limits on the Hempstead Branch of the Long Island Rail Road.

College Point

College Point is a working-middle-class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is located north of Flushing on Flushing Bay and the East River also part of the Queens Community Board 7.[1] Willets Point Boulevard and the Whitestone Expressway are often the neighborhood’s approximate boundaries with Flushing and Whitestone, respectively; College Point also borders Willets Point at the Flushing River at the extreme southwest corner. The 109th Precinct of the New York City Police Department (NYPD) serves College Point.[2] College Point is a diverse community, mostly residential with some industrial areas.

Douglaston

Douglaston is an upper middle class community in the New York City borough of Queens. Douglaston comprises six distinct neighborhoods: Douglas Bay,[2] Douglas Manor,[3] and Douglaston Hill, all located north of Northern Boulevard on the peninsula abutting Little Neck Bay; Douglaston Park, located between Northern Boulevard and the Long Island Expressway; and two areas south of the Expressway, Winchester Estates and an area simply known as Douglaston. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 11[4] and New York City school district 26.

Douglaston is located on the North Shore of Long Island, bordered to the east by Little Neck, and to the west by Bayside. Douglaston’s two ZIP Codes are 11362 and 11363.

Douglaston represents one of the least traditionally urban communities in New York City, with many areas (particularly those north of Northern Boulevard) having a distinctly upscale suburban feel, similar to that of Nassau County towns located nearby (such as Great Neck).

The area is also known for its historical society and other civic groups, notably the Douglaston Civic Association and the Douglas Manor Association.

Flushing

Flushing is a neighborhood in the north-eastern part of the New York City borough of Queens, in the United States. While much of the village is residential, Downtown Flushing, centered on the northern end of Main Street, is a large commercial and retail area and is the fourth largest central business district in New York City.[3][4]

Flushing’s diversity is reflected by the numerous ethnic groups that reside there, including people of Asian, Hispanic, Middle Eastern, European, and African American ancestry. It is part of the Fifth Congressional District, which encompasses the entire northeastern shore of Queens County, and extends into neighboring Nassau County. Flushing is served by five railroad stations on the Long Island Rail Road Port Washington Branch, as well as the New York City Subway’s IRT Flushing Line (7 <7> trains), which has its terminus at Main Street. The intersection of Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue is the third busiest intersection in New York City, behind Times and Herald Squares.[5]

Flushing is part of Queens Community Board 7[6] and is bounded by Flushing Meadows–Corona Park to the west, Utopia Parkway to the east, the Long Island Expressway to the south, and Willets Point Boulevard to the north.

ZIP codes beginning with 113 are administered from a sectional center at Flushing Post Office. The 113-prefixed area extends west into Jackson Heights, southwest into Ridgewood, south into Forest Hills, and east into Little Neck.

Pomonok

Pomonok is a working class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. This large public housing development[1] in South Flushing was built in 1949 on the former site of Pomonok Country Club. The name comes from a Native American word for eastern, and means either “land of tribute” or “land where there is travelling by water”.

The Pomonok Country Club was a golf course in Pomonok between 1886 and 1949. The golf course was located between Kissena Boulevard and 164th Street, just to the south of Horace Harding Boulevard (now the Long Island Expressway) and to the east of Queens College.[2] The club was established in 1886 by members of the Flushing Athletic Club in Flushing and moved to the Kissena Boulevard location in 1921. Devereux Emmet designed the golf course. The members disbanded and sold the course in 1949. Part of the site today contains the Electchester cooperative housing development, Pomonok public housing and an extension of Parsons Boulevard.[2][3] The golf course hosted the PGA Championship in 1939, which Henry Picard won. The tournament was held at the same time of the 1939 New York World’s Fair, which was located at Flushing Meadows–Corona Park, approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) miles northwest of Pomonok Country Club.

Today, Pomonok is a part of Queens Community Board 8, which also includes Fresh Meadows, South Flushing, Cunningham Heights, Hilltop Village, Jamaica Estates, Holliswood, Utopia, Kew Gardens Hills, and Briarwood.[4] Nearby are major facilities such as Queens College, St. John’s University, Touro College, Rabbinical Seminary of America, Queens Hospital Center, New York Hospital Queens, Cunningham Park and many public and private schools. CUNY Law School, formerly in this area, moved to the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens in May 2012. Queens Library has a branch in Pomonok.[5] New York City Bus routes Q25, Q34, Q64, Q65 serve Pomonok. The QM4 runs express from Pomonok to Midtown.[6] The Whitestone Expressway connects Flushing north to the Bronx, south to the Van Wyck Expressway to John F. Kennedy International Airport, and to the Grand Central Parkway and LaGuardia Airport. Main Street is a major commercial street, as is Kissena Boulevard.

In Pomonok, there is also Electchester, a cooperative housing complex at Jewel Avenue and Parsons Boulevard in Pomonok, was established by Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. and Local 3 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in 1949, when Van Arsdale worked with the Joint Industry Board of the Electrical Industry to purchase 103 acres (0.42 km2) of the former Pomonok Country Club and build apartment buildings. 5,550 people live in about 2,500 units in 38 buildings, many of which are six-story brick structures. It is served by Public School 200, which is on land donated by Electchester. The union provided the majority of the mortgage. New York state offered tax abatements. Electchester was classified as a “limited dividend nonprofit”, subject to state regulations. The first families paid $475 per room for equity shares, and carrying charges of $26 per month per room, on apartments ranging from three and a half to five and a half rooms.[7]

The housing complexes that make up the neighborhood of South Flushing (Pomonok Housing Project & Electchester Co-Op) have had some issues with crime, specifically with gangs and drugs. There have been various shootings, robberies and drug busts over the years in the area. Both housing complexes are patrolled by the NYPD’s 107th Precinct. There is also an NYPD PSA-9 Housing Police Unit station located in the Pomonok Houses.

Local politicians Gary Ackerman and Barry Grodenchik lived here during their childhoods, as well as rapper Action Bronson.

Floral Park

Floral Park is an incorporated village in Nassau County, New York, United States, on Long Island. The neighborhood of Floral Park in the New York City borough of Queens, is adjacent to the village. The village is at the western border of Nassau County, and is located mainly in the Town of Hempstead, while the section north of Jericho Turnpike is within the Town of North Hempstead. The population as of the US Census of 2010 is 15,863.[2]

Fresh Meadows

Fresh Meadows is a residential neighborhood in the northeastern section of the New York City borough of Queens. Fresh Meadows is located on the northeast side near Hillcrest, bordered to the east by Cunningham Park, to the south by Union Turnpike and St. John’s University, and to the west by South Flushing. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 8[2] and is served by the United States Postal Service as ZIP codes 11365 and 11366.

Fort Totten

Fort Totten is a former active United States Army installation in the New York City borough of Queens. It is located on the north shore of Long Island, on a peninsula.[3][4] Fort Totten is at the head of Little Neck Bay, which is also the place where the East River widens to become Long Island Sound.[5] While the U.S. Army Reserve continues to maintain a presence at the fort,[6] the property is now owned by the City of New York.[7][8]

Glen Oaks

Glen Oaks is a middle class neighborhood in the easternmost portion of the New York City Borough of Queens. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13.[1]

Kew Gardens Hills

Kew Gardens Hills is a middle class neighborhood in the middle of the New York City borough of Queens. It is situated in the southwestern corner of the area historically known as the Town of Flushing, in its 6th district. Adjacent neighborhoods include Forest Hills to the west, Hillcrest to the east, Briarwood to the south, and Queensboro Hill to the north.

Little Neck

Little Neck is an upper middle class neighborhood of Queens, New York City, bordered on the north by Little Neck Bay and on the east by Great Neck in Nassau County. Due to this proximity to Nassau, Little Neck remains one of the most suburban-looking areas in New York City. The southern border is the Grand Central Parkway, and to the west is Douglaston. The Little Neck station is the easternmost New York City station on the busy Port Washington Branch of the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR), and thus Little Neck is home to the busiest of approximately a dozen remaining railway grade crossings in New York City.[1] The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 11.[2]

Whitestone

Whitestone is an upper middle-class residential neighborhood in the northernmost part of the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood proper is located between the East River to the north and 25th Avenue to the south. Whitestone is surrounded by College Point, Flushing, Bayside, Auburndale, Linden Hill, and Murray Hill.

Whitestone contains the subsection of Malba, which is bounded to the north by the East River, to the east by the Whitestone Expressway, to the south by 14th Avenue, and to the west by 138th Street. Malba was cited in a New York Times article as one of the few “elite enclaves” of Queens.[1]

Corona

Corona is a neighborhood in the borough of Queens in New York City. It is bordered by Flushing to the east, Jackson Heights to the west, Forest Hills and Rego Park to the south, Elmhurst to the southwest, and East Elmhurst to the north. Corona has a multicultural population with a Latino majority, and is the site of historic African American and Italian American communities. After World War II, the majority of the neighborhood’s residents were mostly Italian, German, Irish and of other European ancestries. Corona also has a significant Chinese population.[1]

Corona is bordered on the east by Flushing Meadows–Corona Park, one of the largest parks in New York City and the site of the 1939 and 1964 World’s Fairs. Located within the park are Citi Field, which replaced Shea Stadium as home of the New York Mets baseball team in 2009, and the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where the US Open in tennis is held annually. In North Corona is the northern section of the historic Corona neighborhood, created in 1978 with the formation of the city’s Community Boards and Community Districts, and the need for coterminous borders. Corona’s main thoroughfares include Corona Avenue, Roosevelt Avenue, Northern Boulevard, Junction Boulevard, and 108th Street. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 4, while the northernmost part is included in Community Board 3.[2]Corona’s ZIP code is 11368.

Corona, with East Elmhurst, are often referred to as one combined area, Corona–East Elmhurst.

East Elmhurst

East Elmhurst is a culturally diverse area in the northwest section of the New York City borough of Queens. It is located northeast of Jackson Heights and north of Corona. The area includes La Guardia Airport and is bounded on the east and north by Flushing Bay. Residents are mostly moderate-income families. East Elmhurst is a young working Middle Class Community. The proximity to the City has made this a great location to live. The neighborhood is patrolled by the New York City Police Department’s 115th Precinct;[1] the airport is patrolled by the Port Authority Police Department. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 3.[2] The ZIP codes of East Elmhurst are 11369 and 11370. East Elmhurst and its southern neighbor Corona are often referred to jointly as “Corona/East Elmhurst”.

Elmhurst

Elmhurst (formerly Newtown) is a working/middle class neighborhood in the borough of Queens in New York City. It is bounded by Roosevelt Avenue on the north; the Long Island Expressway on the south; Junction Boulevard on the east; and the New York Connecting Railroad on the west.[3] The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 4.

Forest Hills

Forest Hills is a neighborhood in the borough of Queens in New York City. Originally, the area was referred to as ” White pot “.[2] Forest Hills is bounded by 62nd Drive, Thornton Place, and Selfridge Street to the west, Metropolitan Avenue to the south, Union Turnpike to the east, and the Grand Central Parkway to the north. Forest Hills Gardens, with its Tudor-style houses, is bounded by Burns Street to the north, Union Turnpike to the east, Greenway South and Harrow Street to the south, and Tennis Place and Continental Ave to the west.

Glendale

Glendale is a middle class neighborhood in the west-central portion of the New York City borough of Queens.[1]

Glendale is bordered to the north by a section of the Montauk Branch of the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) in the western portion (Lower and Middle Glendale),[1] and by Cooper and Metropolitan Avenues in the eastern portion (Upper Glendale).[1] To the east, the border is the Rockaway Beach Branch of the LIRR, just east of Woodhaven Boulevard, and Forest Park, from south of Union Turnpike. Forest Park, along with a number of contiguous cemeteries, through which the borough line with Brooklyn runs, creates the southern border. Glendale’s borders are completed in the southwest and west (from Cooper and Wyckoff Avenues) by the Bay Ridge Branch of the LIRR, and in the northwest by Fresh Pond Road and the elevated BMT Myrtle Avenue Line, which, due to its private right of way, creates five dead-end streets north of 68th Avenue. Because Cooper Avenue runs slightly in a diagonal direction, and since Glendale is somewhat rectangular-shaped, it is part of Glendale’s borders at opposite corners of the neighborhood.

Jackson Heights

Jackson Heights is a neighborhood in the northwestern portion of the borough of Queens in New York City. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 3.[3] Jackson Heights is neighbored by North Corona to the east, Elmhurst to the south, Woodside to the west, northern Astoria (Ditmars-Steinway) to the northwest, and East Elmhurst to the northeast. The main ZIP code of Jackson Heights is 11372. According to the 2010 United States Census, the neighborhood has a population of 108,152.[1]

Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens is an upper-middle class neighborhood in the central area of the New York City borough of Queens. Kew Gardens, shaped roughly like a triangle, is bounded to the north by the Jackie Robinson Parkway (formerly the Interboro Parkway), to the east by Van Wyck Expressway and 131st Street, to the south by Hillside Avenue, and to the west by Park Lane, Abingdon Road, and 118th Street. Forest Park and the neighborhood of Forest Hills are to the west, Flushing Meadows–Corona Park north, Richmond Hill south, Briarwood southeast, and Kew Gardens Hills east.

Maspeth

Maspeth is a residential and commercial community in the borough of Queens in New York City. It was founded in the early 17th century by Dutch and English settlers. Neighborhoods sharing borders with Maspeth are Woodside to the north; Sunnyside to the northwest; Greenpoint, Brooklyn to the west; East Williamsburg, Brooklyn to the southwest; Fresh Pond and Ridgewood to the south; and Middle Village and Elmhurst to the east.

Middle Village

Middle Village is a mainly residential neighborhood in the central section of the borough of Queens, New York City, bounded to the north by the Long Island Expressway, to the east by Woodhaven Boulevard, to the south by Cooper Avenue, and to the west by Mount Olivet Cemetery.[2] Middle Village also consists of a small trapezoid-shaped area bounded by Mt. Olivet Crescent to the east, Fresh Pond Road to the west, Eliot Avenue to the north, and Metropolitan Avenue to the south, though this is sometimes considered part of nearby Ridgewood.

Middle Village is bordered by the neighborhoods of Elmhurst to the north, Maspeth and Ridgewood to the west, Glendale to the south, and Rego Park to the east. In 2003, South Elmhurst, an area between Eliot Avenue and the Long Island Expressway, was reassigned from Elmhurst’s ZIP code of 11373 to Middle Village’s ZIP code of 11379. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community District 5, served by Queens Community Board 5.[3] Housing in the neighborhood is largely single-family homes with many attached homes, and small apartment buildings.

Rego Park

Rego Park is a neighborhood in the borough of Queens in New York City. Rego Park is bordered to the north by Elmhurst and Corona, the east and south by Forest Hills and the west by Middle Village. Rego Park’s boundaries include Queens Boulevard, the Long Island Expressway, Woodhaven Boulevard, and Yellowstone Boulevard. There is a large Jewish population in the neighborhood, which features high-rise apartment buildings and detached houses, as well as a large commercial zone.

Rego Park is represented by Queens Community Board 6 (CB 6).[4]

Ridgewood

Ridgewood is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It borders the neighborhoods of Maspeth, Middle Village and Glendale, as well as the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bushwick and East Williamsburg. Historically, the neighborhood straddled the Queens-Brooklyn boundary. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 5.[3]

Woodside

Woodside is a working- and middle-class residential and commercial neighborhood in the western portion of the borough of Queens in New York City. It is bordered on the south by Maspeth, on the north by Astoria, on the west by Sunnyside, and on the east by Elmhurst and Jackson Heights. Some areas are widely residential and very quiet, while other parts, especially the ones around Roosevelt Avenue, are more urban. The neighborhood is located in Queens Community Board 1 and Queens Community Board 2.[2]

In the 19th century the area was part of the Town of Newtown (now Elmhurst). The adjacent area of Winfield was largely incorporated into the post office serving Woodside and as a consequence Winfield lost much of its identity distinct from Woodside. However, with large-scale residential development in the 1860s, Woodside became the largest Irish American community in Queens, being approximately 80% Irish by the 1930s and maintaining a strong Irish culture today. In the early 1990s, many Asian American families moved into the area, with the population being 30% Asian American. South Asians and Latinos have also moved to Woodside in recent years.

Reflecting its longtime diverse foods and drink, the neighborhood is filled with many cultural restaurants and pubs. It is also home to some of the city’s most popular Thai, Filipino, and South American eateries.

Cambria Heights

Cambria Heights is a middle-class neighborhood in the southeastern portion of the New York City borough of Queens. It is bounded by Springfield Boulevard and Francis Lewis Boulevard to the west, the Elmont, Nassau County border on the east, Queens Village to the north, St. Albans to the west, and Montefiore Cemetery and Laurelton, Springfield Gardens and Rosedale to the south.[3] As of 2010, Cambria Heights’s population was 18,677.[1] The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13.[4]

The neighborhood derived its name from the Cambrian era because it is known for its many fossils.[citation needed] At an elevation of 50 feet (15 m), it is one of the highest points in the borough,[5] together with Jackson Heights and Richmond Hill.

The original population consisted primarily of Roman Catholics of Italian, German, and Irish descent, and Jewish families relocating from Brooklyn. The present neighborhood has a large middle class Caribbean and African American population. The median home cost is $450,600.[6]

The public elementary schools in Cambria Heights are P.S. 176[7] and P.S. 147, renamed for astronaut Ronald McNair.[8] There are four magnet high schools on the campus of Andrew Jackson High School, which are dedicated to: arts and humanities; business computer applications; mathematics, science and technology; and law, government and community service. The local Catholic grammar school is Sacred Heart, also with a parish by that name.

Cambria Heights is also the location of the Ohel, the resting place of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson and his predecessor Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn. Tens of thousands of visitors from around the world flock to the site for prayer and blessing.[9]

Hollis

Hollis is a middle-class neighborhood within the southeastern section of the New York City borough of Queens. A predominantly African-American community, the boundaries are considered to be the Atlantic Branch of the Long Island Rail Road to the west, Hillside Avenue to the north, Francis Lewis Boulevard to the east (although parts of Queens Village are addressed as Hollis on water bills), and Murdock Avenue to the south. Much of this area is considered to be within the St. Albans postal district. Hollis is close to Jamaica and Queens Village. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 12.[2] Hollis is patrolled by the NYPD’s 113th Precinct.[3] Public schools in the area are operated by the New York City Department of Education.

Jamaica

Jamaica is a middle-class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 12, which also includes Hollis, St. Albans, Springfield Gardens, Baisley Pond Park, Rochdale Village, and South Jamaica.[4] Jamaica is patrolled by the NYPD’s 103rd, 113th & 105th Precincts.[5]

It was settled under Dutch rule in 1656 in New Netherland as Rustdorp.[6][7] Under British rule, Jamaica became the center of the “Town of Jamaica”. Jamaica was the county seat of Queens County from the formation of the county in 1683 until March 7, 1788, when the town was reorganized by the state government and the county seat was moved to Mineola (now part of Nassau County). In 1814, Jamaica became the first incorporated village on Long Island. When Queens was incorporated into the City of Greater New York in 1898, both the Town of Jamaica and the Village of Jamaica were dissolved, but the neighborhood of Jamaica regained its role as county seat. Today, some locals group Jamaica’s surrounding neighborhoods into an unofficial Greater Jamaica, roughly corresponding to the former Town of Jamaica, including Richmond Hill, Woodhaven, St. Albans, Rosedale, Springfield Gardens, Hollis, Laurelton, Cambria Heights, Queens Village, Howard Beach and Ozone Park.[8]

Jamaica is the location of several government buildings including Queens Civil Court, the civil branch of the Queens County Supreme Court, the Queens County Family Court and the Joseph P. Addabbo Federal Building, home to the Social Security Administration’s Northeastern Program Service Center.[9] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Northeast Regional Laboratory as well as the New York District Office are also located in Jamaica. Jamaica Center, the area around Jamaica Avenue and 165th Street, is a major commercial center, as well as the home of the Central Library of the Queens Borough Public Library. The New York Racing Association, based at Aqueduct Racetrack in South Ozone Park, lists its official address as Jamaica (Central Jamaica once housed NYRA’s Jamaica Racetrack, now the massive Rochdale Village housing development). John F. Kennedy International Airport and the hotels nearby also use Jamaica as their address.

Jamaica Estates

Jamaica Estates is an upper middle class neighborhood located in the New York City borough of Queens. Within Queens Community District 8, Jamaica Estates is served by Queens Community Board 8.[1] It is bounded by Union Turnpike to the north, Hillside Avenue to the south, Utopia Parkway and Homelawn Street to the west, and 188th Street to the east. The main road through the neighborhood is Midland Parkway.

Jamaica Hills

Jamaica Hills is a small middle class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is surrounded by the Grand Central Parkway (north), Jamaica Estates (east), Jamaica (south), and Briarwood(west). It is centered on the terminal moraine which runs the length of Long Island. Originally populated with people who left neighborhoods under ethnic transition, Jamaica Hills started to become more ethnically diverse after 1964. The population today is very mixed with a large South Asian Population and smaller populations from the Caribbean, Central American, and Chinese. Because of the opening of a Greek Orthodox church in the 1960s, many Greek immigrants also live in the area. Jamaica Hills is patrolled by the NYPD’s 107th Precinct.[1][2]

Laurelton

Laurelton is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is a largely middle class neighborhood. Laurelton is part of the former town of Jamaica. Merrick Boulevard, which bisects the community in a generally east-west direction, forms its commercial spine. It is bounded by Springfield Boulevard, 130th Avenue, Laurelton Parkway, and Conduit Avenue. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13.[1]

Queens Village

Queens Village is a mostly residential upper middle class neighborhood in the eastern part of the New York City borough of Queens.[4] The Queens Village Post Office serves the ZIP codes of 11427 (Hollis Hills), 11428 (central Queens Village), and 11429 (Bellaire). The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13.[5]

Shopping in the community is located along Braddock Avenue, Hillside Avenue, Hempstead Avenue, and Jamaica Avenue (NY 25), as well as on Springfield Boulevard. Located just east of Queens Village, in Nassau County, is the Belmont Park race track.

Within the neighborhood are Cunningham Park and Alley Pond Park, as well as the historic Long Island Motor Parkway (LIMP), home of the turn of the century racing competition, the Vanderbilt Cup. The LIMP was built by William Kissam Vanderbilt, a descendant of the family that presided over the New York Central Railroad and Western Union; it is now part of the Brooklyn-Queens Greenway used by bicyclists, joggers and nature trail lovers.

Rosedale

Rosedale is a neighborhood in New York City in the southeastern portion of the borough of Queens. The neighborhood is on the border of Queens and Nassau County, Long Island. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13.

Saint Albans

St. Albans is a middle class community in the New York City borough of Queens centered on the intersection of Linden Boulevard and Farmers Boulevard, about two miles north of JFK Airport. It is southeast of Jamaica, west of Cambria Heights, north of Springfield Gardens, and northwest of Laurelton.[2] The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 12,[3][4] and is served by the St. Albans Post Office, ZIP Code11412. The population within the ZIP code, according to the 2010 census, was 34,882 – a decline of 7% from the 37,452 of 2000.[1]

The small western enclave of Addisleigh Park is a U.S. historic district where many notable African Americans have lived, including Jackie Robinson, W. E. B. Du Bois, and many jazz musicians and entertainers including Fats Waller, Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horne, and Count Basie.[5]

South Jamaica

South Jamaica is a neighborhood in the borough of Queens in New York City, located south of downtown Jamaica. It is part of Queens Community Board 12.[1] Although a proper border has not been established, the neighborhood is an overall subset of the greater Jamaica area that faces the Long Island Rail Road Main Line tracks, Jamaica Avenue and Liberty Avenue to the north; the Van Wyck Expressway on the west; and Merrick Boulevard toward the east, adjoining the neighboring community of St. Albans.[2] Other primary thoroughfares of South Jamaica include Baisley, Foch, Linden, Guy R. Brewer, Sutphin, and Rockaway Boulevards.[3]

Considered a slum in the early 20th century,[4][5] the neighborhood now consists of working-class and middle-class residents.

Springfield Gardens

Springfield Gardens is a working-class neighborhood in the southeastern area of the New York City borough of Queens, bounded to the north by St. Albans, to the east by Laurelton and Rosedale, to the south by John F. Kennedy International Airport, and to the west by Farmers Boulevard. The neighborhood is served by Queens Community Board 12.[1] The area, particularly east of Springfield Boulevard, is sometimes also referred to as Brookville.[2]

Howard Beach

Howard Beach is an upper middle class neighborhood in the southwestern portion of the New York City borough of Queens. It is bordered in the north by the Belt Parkway and South Conduit Avenue in Ozone Park, in the south by Jamaica Bay in Broad Channel, in the east by 102nd–104th Streets, and in the west by 75th Street. The area’s houses are similar to Bayside and Hollis.

The neighborhood is part of Queens Community District 10, served by Queens Community Board 10.[1] It is home to a large Italian-American population.[2] The ZIP code of Howard Beach is 11414.

Ozone Park

Ozone Park is a neighborhood located in the southwestern section of the borough of Queens, in New York City, New York, United States. It borders Woodhaven, Richmond Hill, Howard Beach, and City Line, Brooklyn.[1][2][3] Different parts of the neighborhood are covered by Queens Community Board 9 and 10.[4] The neighborhood is located in the Sixth congressional district, and is represented by Democrat Gregory Meeks.

The northern border is Atlantic Avenue; the southern border is South Conduit Avenue, and the eastern border is 108th Street.[1] The western border is the county line with Brooklyn (mostly along Ruby and Drew Streets[5]). It is the home of the Aqueduct Racetrack, a popular spot for Thoroughbred racing. The neighborhood is known for its large Italian-American population.

The current ground level of Ozone Park is about four feet higher than the original ground level. Initially the avenues and cross streets were raised above ground level and then all of the basements were set on ground level and the land was back filled around the houses. The older houses that were at the original ground level now appear “sunken”; these can be observed on the south side of Sutter Avenue between 83rd and 85th streets.

Richmond Hill

Richmond Hill is a racially and culturally integrated urban neighborhood in southwestern Queens County, a borough of New York City. It abuts Kew Gardens (North), Jamaica (East), Ozone and South Ozone Park (South), and Woodhaven (West). The neighborhood is split between Queens Community Board 9 and 10.[1] Main commercial streets in the neighborhood include Jamaica Avenue, Atlantic Avenue and Liberty Avenue; Richmond Hill is home to a density of Christian churches (both major denominations and storefront), Sikh centers, Hindu temples, Jewish synagogues and mosques.

Richmond Hill is known as Little Guyana, for its large Guyanese immigrant population, as well as Little Punjab, for its large Punjabi immigrant population.[2]

Many residents own their own homes, and some rent out apartments in them. There are also some small apartment buildings. Commercial strips along Jamaica and Liberty Avenue contain mixed use buildings. Atlantic Avenue is commercial. A Long Island Railroad spur and yard provides freight access for business at Jamaica Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard. The ZIP code for Richmond Hill is 11419.

Woodhaven

Woodhaven is a middle-class neighborhood located in the central section of the New York City borough of Queens. Woodhaven, once known as Woodville, has one of the greatest tree populations in the borough and is known for its proximity to the hiking trails of Forest Park. It retains the small-town feel of bygone days and is home to people of many different ethnicities.

The Rockaway Peninsula, commonly referred to as The Rockaways or Rockaway, is the name of a peninsula on Long IslandNew York, all of which is located within the New York City borough of Queens. A popular summer resort area since the 1830s, Rockaway has become a mixture of lower, middle, and upper-class neighborhoods. Its relative isolation from the urban areas of the city, especially Manhattan, has traditionally made it a popular summer retreat. In the 2010s, it became one of the city’s most quickly gentrifying neighborhoods.

The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 14.[1] As of January 1, 2007, the peninsula’s total population is estimated to be just below 130,000.[2] Rockaway is entirely in New York’s 5th congressional district represented by Congressman Gregory Meeks. All ZIP codes in Rockaway begin with 116- and the central post office is in Far Rockaway.